Did you know…

People of every gendre can experience sexual violence

2/3 of victims are under the age of 18 years

Did you know…

CALACS offers help and support to people who are 14 years of age and older

Did you know…

Sexual consent is an obligation! Without a yes, it’s a no!

Did you know that sexual consent is…

Agreeing to participate in sexual activity

Willingly and freely saying yes to sex without feeling pressure, fear or guilt

Willingly and freely saying yes to sex without feeling obligation or feeling threatened

Every person must take every reasonable measure to have their sexual partner’s consent before and during sex

You have the right to say no to sex at any time. You have the right to change your mind and to say stop or no during sex even if you agreed earlier

In Canada, a person may legally consent to sex at age 16. However, there are important conditions that apply to sexual partners who are under the age of 18.

When the youngest partner is 12 or 13 years old, there must be no more than a two year age gap between the sexual partners. (Example: A 12 year old can consent to sex with a partner who is 14 years old but cannot consent to sex with a partner who is 15 years old.)

When the youngest partner is 14 or 15 years old, there must be no more than a five year age gap between the sexual partners. (Example: A 14 year old can consent to sex with a partner who is 19 years old, but cannot consent to sex with a partner who is 20 years old. )

The oldest sexual partner must not be in a position of authority, trust or exploitation towards the youngest partner. The youngest sexual partner should not be dependant on the oldest partner. (Example: A 14 year old girl cannot consent to sex with her soccer coach who is 16 years old even though there is less than a five year age gap. This is because the soccer coach is in a position of authority. )

For more information about sexual consent and the law, please visit educaloi.qc.ca

Did you know…
In most cases, the victim of sexual violence knows their abuser

Sexual assault/violence can be committed by a family member, a friend, an acquaintance and even a romantic partner. A person who is in a position of authority such as a sports coach, a teacher, a babysitter, an employer, etc. can also commit sexual assault/violence.

Myths

Myth: I should hate the person who has sexually assaulted me

False: You might not hate your abuser and you are not abnormal if you don’t. You might even be confused about how you feel about them. This is normal. This often happens when the abuser is a family member, a friend and/or a person you loved and trusted.

Myth: When a boy is sexually abused by a man, he will be homosexual as an adult.

False: Many men who are sexually abused, especially during their childhood, come to believe that they have something inside of them that attracts men or that they must be homosexual. Although it is common for men who have experienced sexual abuse to question their sexuality, sexual abuse does not determine a person’s sexual orientation or gendre identification.

Help For Victims
I have experienced sexual assault / violence
I am a teenager
I am a loved one
Resources

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